Wednesday, 21 February 2018

Challenge Sheep Discussion Groups facilitate farmer-to-farmer learning

Hayley King who is Project Manager for the Challenge Sheep project talks about the recent series of discussion groups and how farmer-to-farmer learning is at the centre of the project.

Since launching Challenge Sheep back in September, we’ve now held over 15 launch events and insightful discussion groups with sheep producers around the country. As project manager, my role is to make sure we collect the data that will help us to understand the consequences of the rearing phase on the lifetime performance of ewes. The project will track 9,500 replacements from thirteen English sheep farms over seven years to understand how flock performance can be improved.

In 2018, we’ve held nine discussion groups around the country on our farms, covering a wide range of topics from nutrition in pregnancy, reducing antibiotic use at lambing and lambing losses, as well as talks around the RUMA #ColostrumisGold Campaign. Each meeting is chaired by the farm’s assigned consultant and vet to ensure the topic benefits the producers from the surrounding area. We’ve also invited external speakers to be involved, like Poppy Frater, from the Scottish Agricultural College, who spoke to our Windermere group about the Live Lambs Project, a project that looks at increasing lamb survival rates by 5 per cent.






There has also been much discussion around the data on farm and analysis of the results, this includes a look into scanning results as well as tupping data. All farmers attending the events have been encouraged to bring along their own data for interpretation and have the opportunity to gain advice from AHDB and the farm vets and consultants.

As project manager the discussion results have been really beneficial as they’ve helped me to understand more about our farms and the story behind their data. However our farmers are learning more each day through farmer-to-farmer learning. Sam Jones, one of our challenge sheep farmers, has found that he’s learnt at least one new thing at every meeting, which makes the meeting valuable for not only himself but the others involved.

The discussion groups offer producers a platform to share their advice on situations where others may need help and also an opportunity to learn from those around them about the management of their flock.

We’ve got more groups throughout the year and would encourage sheep producers to get involved and join in the conversation. The next series of meeting will take place in the summer.

Want to find out more information about your local Challenge Sheep Farm? Information about the project and the farms taking part can be found on the AHDB Beef & Lamb website.


Wednesday, 7 February 2018

Log on for the latest market outlook

With uncertainty around Britain’s exit from the EU, beef and lamb producers are repeatedly asking ‘what are the prospects for our beef and lamb in 2018 and beyond?”. Duncan Wyatt, AHDB Lead analyst, explains why this month’s AHDB Outlook webinar will help answer this question and provide farmers with valuable insight for their businesses.

Many of our levy-payers have animals on the ground today that will not be sent to the abattoir until after Brexit – so gaining a better understanding of possible scenarios for each sector is crucial as they look to the future and prepare themselves for the challenges that may lie ahead.

On 15 February the red meat team from AHDB Market Intelligence will host its second Livestock Outlook Webinar which will focus primarily on this issue and give some valuable insight into the future prospects for the red meat industry. We’ll also be giving a presentation on the outlook for feed markets and an update on AHDB’s Brexit activity. This event will give producers and broader industry stakeholders the chance to review recent developments in their sector and see how the situation may have developed since our last forecasts were published in October.

With the sheep industry particularly vulnerable to a hard Brexit, there is much to address as we look forward. Lamb production is forecast to rise to 312,000 tonnes in 2018, although dressed carcase weights are expected to be stable over the coming years with just small seasonal variations. Imports are not expected to recover hugely from 2017’s lower levels and exports should remain stable, although some increases may be necessary if domestic demand continues to slow.

In the beef sector, the legacy of both dairy and suckler herd growth in recent years will lead to slightly higher numbers of prime cattle, but at lower weights in 2018 and 2019. This will keep production relatively stable at around 900 thousand tonnes. Fluctuations in imports will largely be determined by Irish production, and the market overall is expected to continue to balance with exports.

The webinar is an opportunity for you to ask those all-important questions to our panel of experts during the question and answer session which follows the main presentations.
The webinar will give you access to valuable information without leaving your home or office, and will help you remain well-informed of current market trends and provide answers to help keep your business resilient in testing times.
Anyone interested in taking part in our Livestock Outlook Webinar, at 10:30 am on 15 February, can register at: https://attendee.gotowebinar.com/register/4726584270924402946