Wednesday, 18 October 2017

A farmers’ view of Strategic Farms


Elbridge Farm in Kent is home to Verity Garrett and the Holdstock family. Recently joining the Strategic Farm initiative, the farm holds 230 pedigree sussex breeding cows plus followers and 200 Romney x ewes. Verity explains why she wanted to become one of the Strategic Farms and share advice for the younger generation of farmers.

1. How long have you been working on the family farm?

I grew up on the farm and so from that point of view I have always been involved in farming, but I have actively been working back on the farm for 4 years. Before that I was working for Tesco as a Technical manager in their fresh produce sourcing team following a degree in Agri-business management at Newcastle University.

2. What attracted you to the Strategic Farm initiative?

I saw it as a great opportunity to really look into both our ways of working and expenditure in the livestock arm of the business. It is a fantastic chance to have access to industry expertise and is a great learning platform from both leaders in the industry and the fellow farms involved in the study. I have been conscious for a while that as a farming business we do limited benchmarking and I know it can be a really useful exercise. I also like the fact that the initiative covers both cattle and sheep, as we have only just taken on sheep as part of the farm business.


3. What do you hope to gain from being a Strategic Farm?

I hope that by taking part we will be able to see where our strengths and weaknesses lie and have full transparency of the profitability of the business. Farming a native breed of cattle means our carcase gradings would not be as consistently as high as the continental breeds, but then I also know our inputs and concentrate feed levels will be lower. Therefore it will be interesting to be benchmarked against the other farm types and breeds involved.I am also really interested in the genetics behind the carcase grading, and I am looking to improve our grassland management too.

4. What do you love most about your job?

I love that no two days are the same and working outside on the farm is the best office you can ask for! Working with animals always throws up daily challenges – but I love it and get a huge amount of satisfaction from them especially during calving and lambing.


5. What advice would you give for those just starting out in their careers in agriculture?

There is such a huge range of careers both linked to agriculture and directly in agriculture. The average age of farmers is ever increasing which should be seen as a concern for the industry but also as a great opportunity for young keen people to work in agriculture. People need to be aware that it’s not glamorous or easy, but it’s a fantastic industry with a huge amount of knowledgeable people to learn from.

You can find more about the Strategic Farm project on our website, or follow #StrategicFarms on Twitter.

Wednesday, 4 October 2017

Meat testing is key to determine consumer needs

Consumer research is essential in helping us to make informed decisions here at AHDB Beef & Lamb. Understanding consumers’ preferences of beef and lamb allows us to feedback to the supply chain and ultimately our levy payers who work to produce the perfect product for consumers worldwide. Here Siobhan Slayven, Supply Chain Development Manager, talks about the latest activity, which is helping us assess consumers’ perception of meat quality

AHDB Beef & Lamb has been working with Meat & Livestock Australia (MLA) to understand more about the Meat Standards Australia programme (MSA), which aims to improve the eating quality of beef meat. The MSA programme is based on over 100,000 consumer taste tests and almost 700,000 samples, giving a huge database of information.




Working with the guidance of MLA, we’ve now started to carry out our own trials on beef eating quality to see what we can learn from our consumers. This month we ran some of the first beef tasting trials in three different locations. Participants were asked to sample a variety of beef cuts, which ranged from forequarter cuts to more premium steak cuts. Testers rated the different cuts of meat based on various qualities such as tenderness, juiciness and flavour, along with their perceived quality of the meat and importantly willingness to pay.



The testing was conducted under controlled conditions in individual booths, with each tester being served a different cut, so they would not be testing the same sample as the person that sat next to them. Once all cuts had been rated, participants were asked how much they would pay for an unsatisfactory steak through to a premium steak.



Assessing meat eating quality is really important to help reduce inconsistencies with meat and highlight areas which can be improved. Since the MSA launch, the programme has not only shown an improvement in the eating quality for consumers but has provided financial benefits to producers due to increased premiums for MSA-graded produce. A number of retailer in Australia are also on board, with around 155 Australian brands introducing on-pack labelling.




Working with MLA has provided us with a great opportunity to look at how determine meat eating quality in the UK and raised ideas as to how we could learn from the programmes results.