Wednesday, 12 April 2017

How to integrate livestock into cereal rotations

This blog comes from Paul Hill, AHDB Cereals & Oilseeds Knowledge Exchange Manager for the South East. He has worked with a number of monitor farmers who farm both arable and livestock. Paul originally posted this blog in January of this year.

During a discussion regarding how best to integrate livestock into cereal rotations, it suddenly struck me how specialised agricultural staff have now become and that the days of the multi-talented ‘General Farm Worker’ now seems to have becoming a thing of the past.

While being a specialist isn’t necessarily a bad thing, it does mean that, for many arable farms, it’s not easy to introduce livestock onto a farm as the staff expertise is often not there.
To make matters even more complicated, SMR 13 of the cross compliance rules stipulate that livestock keepers must have sufficient competent staff to prevent livestock welfare problems.

The final concern that arable staff may well have is the fact managing livestock doesn’t go hand in hand with the word ‘holiday’!

However, there is a way around all of this that would be advantageous across different farming sectors and could certainly create opportunities

Farm grazing agreements, rolling grazing licences or share farming agreements would give a great opportunity for specialised arable farms to access skilled stock people and the livestock they manage. It may even bring you extra income.

However, before bringing a third party in to graze your cover crops, rotational grass swards or even your forward cereals, you need to be aware of the responsibilities associated with any such agreement. As it now stands the liabilities under a short term licence fall to the landowner.

Therefore, it is the owner of the land who is liable if a CC breach is breached by this grazing. This means that the financial penalty would fall upon the land owner (Licensor) rather than the grazier (Licensee).   With this in mind, it is crucial that a formal Grazing Licence is duly understood and signed by both parties prior to any animals being released onto the land.  Within this licence, it may well be worth entering a clause that ensures the Licensor is indemnified against any BPS deductions as a result of the licensee breaching any associated CC conditions.  However, this doesn’t make things rocket proof as the only real way to ensure this is to develop a good, trusting, working relationship with the grazier which can only be created if the agreement is beneficially working for both parties. It’s important to ensure everyone achieves the goals they require!

As part of the interest surrounding the benefits of livestock within arable operations, AHDB is carrying out a trial looking at beef systems in arable rotations. This project is investigating the possible benefits of using cattle within a more holistic farming operation in order to increase soil biology, and to benefit subsequent cereal yields through the integration of herbal leys within a rotation.

This sort of management may well prove to be important for farms that have a high black-grass infestation. Bringing the land out of production for two years and using it as a grazing and forage before returning it to cereals can help deplete the existing black-grass seed bank. As a bonus, this could generate a financial income from the grazing rent and/or, forage sales.

>Black-grass information sheet

Finally, there’s a non-profit national programme that promotes the financial sustainability of grazing various types of grassland, and utilising the right livestock for the right purpose. The Grazing Animals Project (GAP) has a grazing database that highlights available land and livestock, called ‘Stock Keep’. This can be found on the GAP website, grazinganimalsproject.org.uk.

With this in mind, I wonder if this kind of methodology now needs to be extended into mainstream farming so to encourage arable farmers and livestock managers to work more closely together. By working together, we can use each other’s specialisms to the greatest advantage.




The original blog can be found on the AHDB Cereals & Oilseeds website: http://cereals-blog.ahdb.org.uk/how-to-integrate-livestock-into-cereal-rotations-staff/